THE WORDWILE CHALLENGE IS NOT TO STRUGGLE TRYING TO MAKE A WORD OF SOME KIND.
THE CHALLENGE IS TO CHOOSE WHICH OF THE WORDS YOU CAN MAKE FROM EVERY DRAW THAT WILL SCORE "WILY WORD" BONUS(ES)

Except in the final stage of the game,
WORDWILE players always have
at least 8 vowels
and 40 consonants to form a word.

Its playing area is limited only by the
size of the tabletop, floor, patio, beach...
Scoring is simple, leaving players
undistracted from seeking "wily words."

Ever drawn such messes
as these?

Ever been unable to play a "good" word because of the board's severe space and creativity limitations?

Ever tiresomely fumbled with clumsy letter tiles while tediously multiplying by colored values then adding?

WORDWILE is a WORTHWHILE way to entertain your family and friends.
Years of exciting, intellectually stimulating, competitive fun for
LESS THAN THE PRICE OF ONE CHEAP SEAT AT A THIRD-RATE EVENT!

 

There is no other game "like" WORDWILE!
Doesn't trying to make plays such as those
sound like stimulating fun for all ages who
can read and spell? - YOU BET IT IS!

Click here
to share
with
WORDWILERS:

Wordwile is a gift that
will be appreciated by
budding writers, teachers,
librarians, language
students, involved parents
...spelling bee, crossword,
and "Wheel of Fortune"
fans... and any lover of words
and word play coupled
with challenging fun...


YOU MUST HAVE ADOBE READER TO OPEN THESE FILES:

       

ABOUT WORDWILE®
AND ITS INVENTOR,
DAN COOK

"Move over Scrabble® !
There’s a smarter
new kid in town!"

About 75 years ago, the Scrabble board game hit the market with a tiny fizzle. But by the 1960s it had become the best-selling tabletop word game in history. Its sales still sizzle.

In the America of 1938, when Scrabble was invented, there were only 29 million high school grads, including 5 million who had finished college. A good cup of coffee was 5¢.

Today, 255 million possess high school diplomas. 87 million of them have a baccalaureate or higher degree. Many now pay a hundred times as much ($5) for a coffee.

My, how times have changed! Electronic communications are light years beyond the chalkboards, blue-lined writing paper and print media of that bygone era. Today, the best jobs require keyboard skills and a high degree of literacy. Those who choose the right words and ways of saying them are even more highly respected and in demand than ever.

That’s why inveterate (and hard-to-beat) Scrabble player Dan Cook decided it was time to bring forth his idea for WordWile —  which he says is, "A much smarter and more educational game, full of intriguing nuances for today’s demanding, less easily amused people. One in which the object is not to struggle trying to make a word of some  kind, but, from the many possibilities before them, to choose the best  ‘wily word’ which will score bonuses. Players use their wiles to make higher scoring words — while hopefully thwarting others from doing so — hence the name WordWile."

Cook explained." I’ve seen both kids and adult Scrabble players sorely discouraged by letter draws like Q-M-H-B-G-D-V or A-I-E-E-O-O-U. Children especially, lose interest when nearly unplayable letters like that make them non-competitive. But for the sake of other players, one can’t just concede — has to suffer on in boredom until the game’s end.

"In adult-level games, WordWile players can form up to 200,000 words, which is 16% (32,000) more than Scrabble’s vocabulary limit. With 98 letter tiles plus 52 possible letters using its two "wild" tiles, Scrabble has only 150 letter options. WordWile provides 1260 possible letters on 100 cubes. A quantum leap in word-making possibilities.

Wordwile comes with a luxurious velvet drawstring pouch which holds the cubes. Players draw straight from it. No clumsy turning or mixing.

WordWilers always have before them, at least eight vowels and about forty consonants. That gives players the chance to make a ‘wily word’ almost every time — even in the face of opponents’ counter-strategies. And the basic scoring is a lot simpler. Each letter is one point —  no distracting red, pink and two shades of blue-square multipliers then various add-ups. Nor are great plays prevented because they would run off the board. Like dominoes, the tabletop, floor, beach, wherever —  is WordWile’s gaming area limit.

"Scrabble is all about vocabulary and spelling. Well, those are just the starting points for WordWile. It’s the usage of the wily words played that allows one to run up bonus score. "

When Cook speaks of "wily words," he’s talking about WordWile’s stimulating challenge to score bonus points based on word formation. The simplest "wily" play is to use all of one’s cubes. The number of letters in the word is multiplied by 2. In adult play, 8 letters are drawn so that’s 16. Then the fun escalates.

Making a "wily word" that RHYMES with one already played scores the number of letters played x3. A SYNONYM or ANTONYM scores x4.

Next up the bonus scale are HOMONYMS or HOMOPHONES, which are words that sound the same but spell differently — ie. pair / pare / pear, for example. They automatically rhyme so there is no bonus for that. Instead they receive x6.

A bit more rare are PALINDROMES (words that spell the same forward or backward such as radar) or EMORDNILAPS (words that, spelled backward, form a different word, such as stressed / desserts) They score x 8. (And if you use all 8 letters to make a RHYME, SYNONYM, etc, add  another x2.)

It takes a bit of spatial thinking and cube-twisting to score x 10 with a THREE DIMENSIONAL word. This is a play that forms one word on the facets facing up and another on one side of the same cubes.

Complicated? No. After a couple of games, most remember all the wily plays — and a handy reminder card comes with each WordWile.

As for counter-strategies, one player might put ORANGE on the table because nothing rhymes (x3) with it, but another might outsmart that ploy by making one of  its color synonyms (x4), TANGERINE.

Trying to come up with such bonus plays in three minutes — doesn’t that sound like fun?  Once it’s a player’s turn, that’s the time limit to make a play. In an actual game, one usually has longer because others are taking their turns.

Scrabble has proven to four generations of children that making old, and learning new words, can be fun. Now, WordWile takes enjoyable personal improvement to a whole new level.

Every day, at work and socially, being able to communicate effectively and clearly becomes more important. Extensive vocabulary, correct usage and spelling can be the difference between respect or disdain, success or failure.

Yes, computers have spell-checkers, but they make no difference between vise (a clamp) / vice (immorality); rack (a shelf)  / wrack (torment); winch (a cable puller) / wench (young woman), and on and on. Misuse diminishes the readers’ opinion of a supposedly well-educated document writer’s professionalism, regardless of their field.

Besides writers and word mavens, WordWile is especially of pleasurable and practical use to teachers, librarians, involved parents, crossword, Wheel of Fortune® and spelling bee enthusiasts.

Language students? Certainly. The WordWile rule booklet is in English, German and Spanish, the latter two being rooted in ancient Gothic and Latin, two prime precursors of modern English.

"WordWile can be played in most any language that’s based on the Latin alphabet," Cook said," With so many letters available, specialized groups of players can create their own versions using only medical, legal or other profession-specific words. Religion-based games are also possible.  At a baby shower, guests can draw cubes and form suggested baby names using what they have, often with hilarious results.

"WordWile is a worthwhile way to entertain your family and friends," Cook continued," Years of versatile, exciting, intellectually stimulating, competitive fun together for less than the price of one cheap seat at a third-rate event."
 

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